Adult Program

Join Four in Maine artists for explorations of their work and artistic influences. On their respective evenings, the artists will give back-to-back slideshow presentations. The audience will then be invited to view each artist’s sculpture as installed on the museum grounds. The works by these artists range from organic forms and metaphorical uses of light and shadow to massive granite boulders and investigations of perception.

Location: Farnsworth auditorium
Seating: limited to 70 people
Join Four in Maine artists for explorations of their work and artistic influences. On their respective evenings, the artists will give back-to-back slideshow presentations. The audience will then be invited to view each artist’s sculpture as installed on the museum grounds. The works by these artists range from organic forms and metaphorical uses of light and shadow to massive granite boulders and investigations of perception.

Location: Farnsworth auditorium
Seating: limited to 70 people
Cost: $5 members; $8 nonmembers
 
As part of the 2010 Maine in America Award celebration, Chief Curator Michael K. Komanecky will discuss the exhibition .Alex Katz: New Works. Katz is regarded as one of the most important artists of his generation. As painter, printmaker, sculptor and draftsman, Katz has explored two main themes over the course of his long and successful career: landscape and the figure. It is his commitment to an essentially representational approach combined with his interest in rendering his subjects in flat, essentially unmodulated forms that sets Katz apart from many of his contemporaries. These simultaneous interests, in landscape and portrait, and realism and abstraction, have guided his work for more than sixty years.
 
Three generations of Wyeths—N.C., Andrew and Jamie—have together established themselves as one of America’s foremost artist families. As members of a closely knit family they, along with their siblings, cousins and other family members, have often given pieces of their art to each other. The talk will explore works that range from the public to the private: major paintings, intimate sketches, Christmas cards, notes and letters.
Join the Farnsworth’s curatorial staff and special guest speakers for intimate walking tours in the museum galleries. These monthly talks provide the opportunity to learn from experts about the history behind specific works, details of the artists’ processes and deeper intellectual foundations for their art.
 

Nevelson built sculptures by seeing the beauty in materials and shapes; in the arrangement of forms she saw their harmony with one another. Her approach is recognizable as assemblage or collage in her sculpture and printmaking. Connections between these art forms will be discussed.

Join the Farnsworth’s curatorial staff and special guest speakers for intimate walking tours in the museum galleries. These monthly talks provide the opportunity to learn from experts about the history behind specific works, details of the artists’ processes and deeper intellectual foundations for their art. 

A recurrent interest of Alex Katz has been the human figure, particularly large-scale portrait heads of one or more people on a single canvas. Over the years, many of his subjects have been family and friends, but occasionally Katz finds new models. In this interview, Chief Curator Michael K. Komanecky will discuss with Zofia Lamprecht what it was like to be one of Katz's models. Then a Lincolnville resident, Lamprecht approached Katz to take his photograph, only to have Katz ask her to sit for him. The result was Katz's 2009 painting, Inka and Zofia, which is included in the current exhibition, Alex Katz: New Works.
 
In the late 19th century, American watercolor developed into an internationally recognized art form. Painters such as Winslow Homer, Maurice Prendergast, Edward Hopper and John Marin created many luminous works. The Farnsworth’s Registrar Angela Waldron, who organized the exhibition, will give an overview and discuss some of her favorite works that, due to their fragility, are seldom on view.
 

For about a century hooked rugs have been avidly sought by collectors, artists and connoisseurs. Rug hooking spread rapidly from its nineteenth-century origins with the state of Maine central to its progress as a recognized art form. Rug types, makers, and movements all originating in Maine will be discussed. Guest curator Mildred Cole Péladeau is the author of Rug Hooking in Maine 1838-1940.

Open to all ages and levels of practice, this class aims to draw from the participants’ character, experience and hand rather than teach one method of approach to art-making. Through a brief exposure to many media, it will encourage students to find the media their gifts have the most affinity for and pursue subjects they are attracted to. Spirit, energy and strange individuality are supported. 
For over 25 years, instructor Sam Cady has taught in the MFA program at the School of Visual Arts in New York. His own work begins with the physical, visible world and the ideas and emotions it triggers. Cady’s work can be seen at the Caldbeck Gallery in Rockland.
Location: Gamble Education Center
Level: beginner to advanced
Encaustic, meaning "to burn in," dates back to the fifth century B.C.  Used as a contemporary medium it is a versatile method of painting with a beeswax-based paint kept molten on a heated palette. In addition to seeing a slide presentation on the history and contemporary use of encaustic, participants will learn about safe studio set up, how to prepare supports and make encaustic medium, and wax application. Techniques such as fusing, color mixing, layering, masking, scraping, etching a line, collaging and embedding found objects will be used with materials such as impasto modeling wax, pigment sticks, graphite and Xerox image transfers. Demonstrations will be introduced between work blocks allowing students ample time to experiment with techniques.