Film

The husband-and-wife team of Charles and Ray Eames are widely regarded as America’s most important designers. Perhaps best remembered for their mid-century plywood and fiberglass furniture, the Eames Office also created a mind-bending variety of other products, from splints for wounded military during World War II, to photography, interiors, multi-media exhibits, graphics, games, films and toys. But their personal lives and influence on significant events in American life – from the development of modernism, to the rise of the computer age – has been less widely understood. Narrated by James Franco, Eames: The Architect and the Painter is the first film since their death dedicated to these creative geniuses and their work.
 

This documentary film directed by Michael Rapaport is about one of the most influential and groundbreaking musical groups in hip-hop history. Having released five gold and platinum selling albums within eight years, A Tribe Called Quest has been one of the most commercially successful and artistically significant musical groups in recent history, and regarded as iconic pioneers of hip hop. Rapaport sets out on tour with A Tribe Called Quest in 2008, when they reunited to perform sold-out concerts across the country. This film was an Official Selection of the 2011 Sundance Film Festival.

In collaboration with the Camden International Film Festival, the Farnsworth Art Museum co-presents the documentary film Unfinished Spaces. The film tells the story of three young, visionary architects who were commissioned by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara to create Cuba's National Art Schools in 1961. Dancers, musicians and artists from all over the country reveled in the beauty of the schools, but as the dream of the Revolution gave way to reality, construction was abruptly halted. Forty years later the schools are in use, but remain unfinished and decaying. Castro has invited the exiled architects back to finish their unrealized dream. Director of Education, Roger Dell, will lead a post-film conversation with directors Alysa Nahmias and Ben Murray.
 
El Bulli: Cooking in Progress follows three-star chef Ferran Adrià, widely considered the best, most innovative, and craziest chef in the world. “Creativity means not copying” and Adrià has made this motto of his everyday pursuits. Viewers will closely observe this quest from initial experimentation to the premiere of the finished dish. Many an ingredient is examined in a totally new way, ideas emerge, are discussed, and finally all the results, whether good or bad, are thoroughly documented on a laptop beside the cooking spoon. An elegant, detailed study of food as avant-garde art, El Bulli: Cooking in Progress is a tasty peek at some of the world’s most innovative and exciting cooking; as Adrià himself puts it, “the more bewilderment, the better!”
Johannes Vermeer died nearly 350 years ago, but his work continues to evoke inspiration and passion. Shot largely in New York (home to a third of the world's Vermeer paintings), the film also travels to Holland, France, London and Washington, introducing us to artists, writers and photographers whose lives and work have been touched by the painter from Delft.