Lecture

Lecture by Richard Lindemann

The first lecture in The Art of the Book Lecture Series will trace western book illustration from the illuminated manuscript to such contemporary works as artists’ books and e-books. Maine illustrators and book artists will feature prominently among the examples, which will be drawn  primarily from rare books in the Bowdoin College Library.

A Lecture by Scholar Henry Adams
This lecture is sold out.
In honor of Veterans Day, the Farnsworth invites historian Peter H. Wood to discuss one of Winslow Homer’s most striking paintings, a wartime image of an enslaved black woman in Georgia. The painting disappeared for a century after its completion in 1866 and its revealing original title, “Near Andersonville,” was not uncovered until 1987. This lecture will delve deeply into this forgotten picture for the first time, expanding our view of this great American artist and challenge American culture’s lingering reluctance to confront its own painful past. By integrating art and history, Wood will give a fresh and provocative vantage point on Homer’s early career, the struggle to end slavery, and the closing years of the Civil War, when the outcome was far more doubtful than most people now realize. 
This three-part series will explore the homes and artistic lives of three of Maine’s treasured artists: Dahlov Ipcar (b. 1917), Bernard Langlais (1923-1977) and Jonathan Fisher (1768-1847). Each artist lived most of their lives in Maine and suffused their immediate living environments with their rich imaginative lives. Ipcar, Langlais, and Fisher’s homes all reflect their unique and multi-dimensional artistic personalities—blends of whimsy and functionality—ranging from monumental wooden animals to handmade furniture, hand-painted murals to fine prints.
 
Lecture 3 – The Jonathan Fisher Homestead
Lecture by Brad Emerson, President of the Board, Jonathan Fisher Memorial
This three-part series will explore the homes and artistic lives of three of Maine’s treasured artists: Dahlov Ipcar (b. 1917), Bernard Langlais (1923-1977) and Jonathan Fisher (1768-1847). Each artist lived most of their lives in Maine and suffused their immediate living environments with their rich imaginative lives. Ipcar, Langlais, and Fisher’s homes all reflect their unique and multi-dimensional artistic personalities—blends of whimsy and functionality—ranging from monumental wooden animals to handmade furniture, hand-painted murals to fine prints.
 
Lecture 2 Blackie’s World: Bernard and Helen Langlais in Cushing
THIS LECTURE IS CURRENTLY SOLD OUT.
 
This three-part series will explore the homes and artistic lives of three of Maine’s treasured artists: Dahlov Ipcar (b. 1917), Bernard Langlais (1923-1977) and Jonathan Fisher (1768-1847). Each artist lived most of their lives in Maine and suffused their immediate living environments with their rich imaginative lives. Ipcar, Langlais, and Fisher’s homes all reflect their unique and multi-dimensional artistic personalities—blends of whimsy and functionality—ranging from monumental wooden animals to handmade furniture, hand-painted murals to fine prints.
 
All lectures are SOLD OUT. To be added to a wait list, please email kfinlay@farnsworthmuseum.org
 
This is the first lecture in a series of lectures examining two of our consuming passions: art and food.
 
Lecture Three: À Votre Santé: Food and Health
This lecture will begin with an examination of the connection between food, eating and our health. The diets of long-lived cultures around the world will be explored, along with the latest thinking on how to eat for both health and pleasure in the modern world. Another aspect of this lecture will be a survey of how modern and contemporary artists use food in painting, sculpture, photography and film. The lecture and the series will conclude with an exploration of how Maine is fast becoming a leader in one component of a healthier diet: fresh, local, organic foods.
This is the first lecture in a series of lectures examining two of our consuming passions: art and food.
 
Lecture Two: Eat, Drink and Be Merry!
This lecture will focus on the physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of food and cooking. For example, how does food stimulate the reward centers of the brain? Why do people across time and cultures socialize around meals? Artworks such as sensuous Dutch still-life paintings will be read as visual poems to national pride and prosperity, filled with glorious depictions of Dutch cheese and butter, and also with international treasures such as French wine, Baltic grain for bread, Indian pepper, and Chinese porcelains.