Lecture

This lecture explores the visual strategies employed by illustrators like N. C. Wyeth, Maxfield Parrish, and Norman Rockwell to transport viewers-into the adventure of a story, for example, or to the store to buy a product. By considering their techniques in relation to the advertising trade literature that emerged in the early-twentieth-century and period theories of the workings of the imagination, the lecture demonstrates the complexity of commercial imagery in these years, whether story illustration, magazine cover, or product advertisement.
 
Where do ideas come from and how is a picture book made? Award-winning author and illustrator Melissa Sweet will talk about creating children's books with slides of her process, including her newest book, A SPLASH OF RED: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin by Jen Bryant. This book shares the story of a self-taught African American artist who overcame poverty, racism, disability and war to become an American master. N.C. Wyeth, who knew Horace Pippin from Pennsylvania, wrote of Pippin's art: "It is some of the purest expression I have seen in a long time."
 
Minders of Make Believe; Or, Children’s Book History in Ten Giant Steps from the New England Primer to Harry Potter
"What should our children read?" In this wide-ranging illustrated talk, noted cultural historian Leonard Marcus highlights ten key moments in the lively three-hundred-year-old American debate that has by turns made allies--and enemies--of our nation's publishers, librarians, religious leaders, parents, and educators. Find out how the genteel backwater that was once children's book publishing gradually morphed into big business, and how children's book illustration finally won acceptance as art form.
 
Jonathan Fisher (1768-1847), resident Congregational minister in Blue Hill, Maine was writer, linguist, inventor, architect, surveyor, farmer, pastor, naturalist, artist-and traveler. His drawings of animals were developed as finely worked engravings in boxwood over a period of several years, resulting in the completed work, Scripture Animals, Or Natural History of the Living Creatures Named in the Bible which is the focus of the exhibition, A Wondrous Journey: Jonathan Fisher and the Making of Scripture Animals (on view starting March 23 in the Craig Gallery).
 
Jonathan Fisher (1768-1847), resident Congregational minister in Blue Hill, Maine was writer, linguist, inventor, architect, surveyor, farmer, pastor, naturalist, artist-and traveler. His drawings of animals were developed as finely worked engravings in boxwood over a period of several years, resulting in the completed work, Scripture Animals, Or Natural History of the Living Creatures Named in the Bible which is the focus of the exhibition, A Wondrous Journey: Jonathan Fisher and the Making of Scripture Animals (on view starting March 23 in the Craig Gallery).
 
Lecture Three—Print on the Maine Frontier: Jonathan Fisher and the Early Republic
Jonathan Fisher (1768-1847), resident Congregational minister in Blue Hill, Maine was writer, linguist, inventor, architect, surveyor, farmer, pastor, naturalist, artist-and traveler. His drawings of animals were developed as finely worked engravings in boxwood over a period of several years, resulting in the completed work, Scripture Animals, Or Natural History of the Living Creatures Named in the Bible which is the focus of the exhibition, A Wondrous Journey: Jonathan Fisher and the Making of Scripture Animals (on view starting March 23 in the Craig Gallery).
 
Lecture Two—The Making of Scripture Animals
These two illustrated lectures will provide an in depth look into works recently acquired by the museum, which are currently a part of the Recent Acquisitions exhibition (on view through March 10). Important American modernists, Marguerite Zorach, William Zorach, and Georgia O’Keeffe, were all born in 1880s and became significant artistic figures in the twentieth century—inspired as they were by nature and by the feminine.
 
Lecture Two—The Early Drawings of Georgia O’Keeffe
Wednesday, March 6, 2 p.m.
This richly illustrated lecture will provide context for the work of Ellen Berkenblit, Juan Gomez, and Julian Opie—three artists featured in the Other Voices exhibition (on view in the Nevelson Gallery through Feb. 2). Art writer and independent curator Britta Konau will address the significance of these three artists in the larger contemporary art world and their unique explorations of the human figure. At various stages of their careers and utilizing artistic styles that differ widely, their figurative exploration is deeply informed by past art as well as contemporary popular culture.
 
Lecturer Britta Konau is an independent art critic, writer, and curator.
Location: Farnsworth auditorium