Adult Program + Children/Family Program + Educator Workshop

One of the best-known art writers in the U.S., Kenneth Baker began his career at The Boston Phoenix and for over two decades has been writing for the San Francisco Chronicle. His reviews cover a range of historical and contemporary art exhibitions. He has written Minimalism: Art of Circumstance as well as numerous catalog essays. (Clement Greenberg coined the term "homeless representation" in 1962 and the phrase has since taken on echoes never intended or imagined by him)
 
Co-sponsored by the Center for Maine Contemporary Art
Location: Farnsworth auditorium
Seating: limited to 80 people
Join one of our wonderful docents for a gallery tours of the museum’s summer exhibitions! 
 
Tours begin at the museum’s main lobby at 1 p.m.
 
No advance reservations are required and they are free with museum admission.
 
Become better acquainted with the history of the museum and see the highlights of the collection and current exhibitions by taking a tour with an experienced museum docent!
 
 

SOLD OUT

On Sunday, November 22, the Farnsworth Forum brings author David McCullough to the Strand Theatre in Rockland.

Join Four in Maine artists – Susan Groce, Chris Pinchbeck, Sam Van Aken and Brian White – to learn about the nature of art making in Maine today. Each artist will give a special presentation and gallery talk.
 
May 16—Susan Groce
 
Cost: $8 members, $10 non-members 
Limited to 80 participants

 

Join Four in Maine artists – Susan Groce, Chris Pinchbeck, Sam Van Aken and Brian White – to learn about the nature of art making in Maine today. Each artist will give a special presentation and gallery talk.
 
May 9—Sam Van Aken
 
Cost: $8 members, $10 non-members 
Limited to 80 participants
 
The fourth gallery talk in the series, hosted by curatorial assistant Jane Bianco, will explore the prints on view in the Achieving American Art exhibition.These prints serve as sharp commentaries on the national experience during the Great Depression and between the two World Wars. Artists in search of a quintessential American viewpoint made prints celebrating technology and the changing urban and rural landscapes, while other works explored the less romanticized, gritty side of life using satire or symbolism. Printmakers such as Kerr Eby adopted a realistic style in conveying the harsh reality of the huge loss of life from the bombs, poison gases and trench warfare of the first Great War.
Join guest curator, collector and professor emeritus John Wilmerding to learn about Robert Indiana’s paintings as quintessential pop art. Wilmerding will discuss how the artist’s fascination with letters and numbers, billboards and other vernacular signage has resulted in some of the most iconic images in modern American art.
Led by author Kathleen Ellis, this workshop will explore the connections between poetry and art, using the museum's exhibits, Rockland waterfront and historic Olson House as sources for writing. This year's focus will be on Robert Indiana’s outdoor sculpture. Experimentation with various types of collaboration and visual media will be used to jumpstart new poems. Participants will expand their range of possibilities using writing exercises, word games, found objects and group critiques.