Adult Program + Children/Family Program + Educator Workshop

This weeklong workshop will provide kids ages 8 to 12 years old with a strong foundation of artistic skills including color understanding, line variety, and what makes a strong composition. There will be many creative opportunities for participants to share their unique stories and ideas. Weather permitting the group will work outside and make visits to the Farnsworth museum and local gallery shows. Students should come with a bagged lunch. Each session will end with a positive critique of the day’s work, which parents are invited to attend.
 
Through a study of color, form, and space, young artists will transform a variety of media into unique artscapes. Venturing into the museum for discovery trips, participants will find inspiration from artists such as sculptor Louise Nevelson, photographer Paul Caponigro, and painter Andrew Wyeth. Through guided inquiry, children will explore how these artists create their places of imagination and carry the magic of these discoveries into the studio to transform materials into their own worlds of imagination. A healthy snack will be provided, and kids should also plan on bringing a lunch along with their creativity. Instructor Kathleen Gass studied drawing and fiber arts at the State University of New York and has been an art educator for the past 20 years.
Location: Gamble Education Center
In this one-day workshop, kids ages 5 to 7 years old are invited to come with their parents to learn simple printmaking processes. Using safe and easy to handle materials, kids will get to experiment with basic stamping, creating drypoints on soft plates, and building up surfaces with hand cut forms for relief printing. Participants will get to leave with a small portfolio of their original artwork. The workshop will be led by Kelly Finlay, Education Coordinator at the Farnsworth.
 
Location: Gamble Education Center
Level: ages 5 to 7 years
Class size: limited to 10 students
Cost: $10 members, $12 nonmembers
 
After being beaten into a brain-damaging coma by five men outside a bar, Mark builds a 1/6th scale World War II-era town in his backyard. Mark populates the town he dubs "Marwencol" with dolls representing his friends and family and creates life-like photographs detailing the town's many relationships and dramas. Playing in the town and photographing the action helps Mark to recover his hand-eye coordination and deal with the psychic wounds of the attack. When Mark and his photographs are discovered, a prestigious New York gallery sets up an art show. Suddenly Mark's homemade therapy is deemed "art", forcing him to choose between the safety of his fantasy life in Marwencol and the real world that he's avoided since the attack.